IRS single out scandal: Governor Rick Scott comments

The governor was using the visit to celebrate legislation…

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IRS single out scandal: Governor Rick Scott comments

The governor was using the visit to celebrate legislation…

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IRS single out scandal: Governor Rick Scott comments

The governor was using the visit to celebrate legislation recently passed by the State of Florida Legislature eliminating sales tax on manufacturing equipment.
The governor was using the visit to celebrate legislation recently passed by the State of Florida Legislature eliminating sales tax on manufacturing equipment.
Credits:
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Governor Rick Scott is a firm believer in the first amendment‘s power to protect and facilitate prosperity within Florida‘s communities. The Florida governor was seen recently greeting people, during a visit to Port Miami, while celebrating the legislation recently passed. People rejoiced in the victory eliminating sales tax on manufacturing equipment to help create jobs and economy for hard working Florida citizens, a product of the free exchange of ideas under the first amendment. May 15, 2013, The Objective Review asked for Governor Rick Scott to comment on the IRS report and he responded ‘the IRS should not be targeting anyone for political reasons – no matter what party they are in.’

President Obama announced Wednesdayevening that acting IRS Commissioner Steven Miller had resigned due to the scandal involving the targeting of certain political groups that had applied for tax-exempt status some of which were right here in south Florida. “I will not tolerate this kind of behavior in any agency, but especially in the IRS, given the power that it has and the reach that it has into all of our lives,” Obama said.

In a letter to agency employees, Miller said he would leave in early June. “This has been an incredibly difficult time for the IRS given the events of the past few days, and there is a strong and immediate need to restore public trust in the nation’s tax agency,” he wrote. The concept of the public trust relates back to the origins of democratic government and its seminal idea that within the public lies the true power and future of a society; therefore, whatever trust the public places in its officials must be respected. One of the reasons that bribery is regarded as a notorious evil is that it contributes to a culture of political corruption in which the public trust is eroded.

Great questions of concern are being raised on Capitol Hill today, as previous presidents have been known to use tactics correlated with the improper use of the IRS office for political gain. How many scandals have happened under the current administration? The fast and furious gun running, the Benghazi attack ignored, the IRS single out scandal and more. How much more will the public trust be damaged by the current administration in the land of the free and the home of the brave?

We will see as the current events unfold…

Breaking news: In Brevard locals team up to conceal crimes

Brevard County Sheriff Credits: Roberto Gonzalez / Getty…

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Breaking news: In Brevard locals team up to conceal crimes

Brevard County Sheriff Credits: Roberto Gonzalez / Getty…

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Breaking news: In Brevard locals team up to conceal crimes

Brevard County Sheriff
Brevard County Sheriff
Credits:
Roberto Gonzalez / Getty Images
In Brevard County it appears conspiracy and collusion has become the norm for some locals and attorneys who plot to conceal crimes to beat the statute of limitations. Major Andrew WaltersBrevard County Sheriff’s Department, stated the statute of limitations had run out and he could not comment on whether a crime was committed or not. Major Walters said there must be a report for them to investigate and he could not investigate if the statute of limitations had run out. Major Walters also stated he had no knowledge of the event until now. 

What happened? Who did it? How and why? The answer is simple although it may appear complex. May 17, 2013 an official inquiry was launched by T.O.R. with B.C.S.O. and today a follow has been requested.

Andrew Walters has 23-years of law enforcement service with the Brevard CountySheriff’s Office and currently Commands the Sheriff’s North Precinct. Mr. Walters served as the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office spokesperson for over 3 years (2005-2008). At the rank of Major, he served as a Countywide Watch Commander, Commanded the Special Operations Division and served as the Assistant Precinct Commander to North Precinct prior to his current assignment of Commanding the Sheriff’s North Precinct. He is the current President of Brevard County TRIAD Inc., a non-profit organization serving senior citizens in Brevard County. In addition to TRIAD, he serves on the Board of Directors for Central Florida Crimeline and Crosswinds Youth Services.

Accordingly, it would appear at first glance the statute of limitations has run out for a kidnapping that took place May 5th, 2010, found as fact in a court of law on June 17th, 2010, while the Melbourne Police Department made no arrest. Complaints were made about the Melbourne Officers involved and the Chief of Police Steve Mimbs was informed of their actions. Internal affairs would should have head up that investigation as the internal affairs unit is under direct authority of the Chief of Police.

These officers entered conflicting reports that falsify statements made by the parents in aid of the kidnapper, Yvonne Howard, and her attorney Scarlett Davidson of Culmer and Davidson P.A.. This is proven as they refused to issue a missing child report for a period of 2 weeks while the child was missing. At the time, Brevard County Sheriff’s Department said because it had taken place in Melbourne that it was the Melbourne Police Department’s Jurisdictionand they lacked jurisdiction. At that time the parents contacted the Florida Department of Law Enforcement who then contacted the Brevard County Sheriff’s Department who issued the missing child report 2 weeks after the child was kidnapped by Yvonne Howard as found as fact in a court of law according to Florida Statute 787.03 and 787.04.

As a point of law the statute of limitations indeed has run out on the initial act but it was also found by witnesses and 2 Florida Bar certified Attorneys on June 17, 2010 that Yvonne Howard was interfering again, with the ratifying actions of her attorney Scarlett Davidson attempting to conceal those acts, in which the statute of limitations has not run out on. Will they be allowed to avoid prosecution by the limitations again? The limitations on that incident will run out this June in 2013.

Further investigation shows a civil action was filed that is only allowed to go for approximately 60 to 120 days. However, that action, due to the actions and witness tampering by Attorney Scarlett Davidson, continued by Attorney Scarlett Davidson’s requests and vexatious litigation for a period of 3 years. A period required to avoid legal process on the original child abduction act committed by Scarlett Davidson’s client Yvonne Howard. The statute of limitations is 3 years and to no surprise the civil action, in which Judge Charles Crawford said ‘I have no Jurisdiction over felonies’, has continued for three years, surpassing the 120 day period.

Do local Brevard County attorneys have inside connections with law enforcement to conceal crimes and interfere with investigations? Do the superior officers in charge have knowledge of these actions within their departments? Will Sheriff Wayne Ivey address the issues the victimized families of Brevard County face today?

Major Walters stated the statute of limitations on the one incident had run out. He also stated he had no knowledge of the incident before May 2013. However, The Objective Review will be seeking further inquiry as a report was made and that report was sent to an officer no longer with Brevard County Sheriff’s Office.

How can a report be investigated by a retired officer? These are the serious questions left to Sheriff Wayne Ivey emitting from the Sheriff Jack Parker administration. Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey has been a law enforcement officer for over three decades. Sheriff Ivey is a graduate of the FBI National Academy and has a Bachelor’s Degree from Daytona State College in management and supervision. Sheriff Ivey’s background in law enforcement is inclusive of management, criminal investigations, narcotics, patrol services, public integrity investigations, and corrections. Sheriff Wayne Ivey, prior to being elected in 2012, served the citizens of the State of Florida as a resident agent in charge for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

The last question we have for inquiry is: Has Public Information Officer Fernes forwarded this inquiry to Sheriff Wayne Ivey? Constitutional government is authorized by the people through the authority of the constitutions. Do local Brevard County officials honor their oath to uphold the authority of their office?

The Florida Constitution in article 1 located at section 4 states: Freedom of speech and press.—Every person may speak, write and publish sentiments on all subjects but shall be responsible for the abuse of that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge the liberty of speech or of the press. In all criminal prosecutions and civil actions for defamation the truth may be given in evidence. ‘If the matter charged as defamatory is true and was published with good motives, the party shall be acquitted or exonerated.’

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

… this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

The Objective Review: Our mission

Today’s Mission:

I want to humanize the news and get back to common sense observations to inform the general public at large. This mission doesn’t come easily to me in the world of media today. In order to be sure the public is informed without a blood thirst for sensationalism and ratings, against the expectations of mainstream media, I had to forge my own mission. I mention all of this to say that while we all take different paths, for most of us, journalism is a calling, not simply an adventure. So be it not an outlandish idea that personal missions drive what we do as journalists.

These missions embody what we value most. Maybe we want to help others, or uncover corruption and the abuse of power. Maybe we want to understand and explain how things work, or create positive change in our communities.

The challenge we face, though, is that the longer we stay in the business, the more we’re apt to forget why we got into it. That’s why writing a personal mission statement can be helpful, because it can remind us about our passions.

As journalists we treat the public fairly and openly. Whatever the issue, we tell our audiences the complete, unvarnished truth as best we can learn it. We correct our errors explicitly as soon as we become aware of them.

Any member of The Objective Review who deals with the public is expected to honor that principle, knowing that ultimately the public is our employer. Civility applies whether an exchange takes place in person, by telephone, by letter or by e-mail.

We gather information for the benefit of the people. Journalists at The Objective Review, or on assignment for one of its newsrooms, may not use their position to make inquiries for any other purpose.

We treat news sources fairly and professionally. We do not inquire pointlessly into someone’s personal life. We do not threaten to damage uncooperative sources, nor do we promise favorable coverage in return for cooperation. We do not pay for interviews or unpublished documents: to do so would create an incentive for sources to falsify material and would cast into doubt the genuineness of much that we publish.

Staff members and others on assignment for us should disclose their identity to people they cover, though they need not always announce their occupation when seeking information normally available to the public. Those working for us as journalists may not pose as anyone they are not – for example, police officers or lawyers.

Critics and other writers who review performances or goods and services offered to the public may conceal their press identity, but they may not normally assert a false identity or affiliation.

Staff members and others on assignment for us must obey the law in the gathering of news. They may not break into buildings, homes, apartments or offices.

Web pages and Web logs present imaginative opportunities for personal expression and exciting new journalism. When created by our staff or published on our Web sites, they also require cautions, magnified by the Web’s unlimited reach.

What is our mission?

To Expose…
To Enlighten…
To Commemorate…

“so it is to the printing press–to the recorder of man’s deeds, the keeper of his conscience, the courier of his news–that we look for strength and assistance, confident that with your help man will be what he was born to be: free and independent.” ~John F. Kennedy

“The greater the importance of safeguarding the community from incitements to the overthrow of our institutions by force and violence, the more imperative is the need to preserve inviolate the constitutional rights of free speech, free press and free assembly in order to maintain the opportunity for free political discussion, to the end that government may be responsive to the will of the people.”

New York Times Co. v. US 403 U.S. 713 No. 1873

Contributing to the people with passion and diligence through vigorous and tedious research to get the facts out for an objective review.

The Florida Constitution in article 1 located at section 4 states: Freedom of speech and press.—Every person may speak, write and publish sentiments on all subjects but shall be responsible for the abuse of that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge the liberty of speech or of the press. In all criminal prosecutions and civil actions for defamation the truth may be given in evidence. ’If the matter charged as defamatory is true and was published with good motives, the party shall be acquitted or exonerated.’

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

… this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

~THE OBJECTIVE REVIEW~

Contact us:
http://www.theobjectivereview.com
info@theobjectivereview.com

The Objective Review: Our mission

Today:

I want to humanize the news and get back to common sense observations to inform the general public at large. This mission doesn’t come easily to me in the world of media today. In order to be sure the public is informed without a blood thirst for sensationalism and ratings, against the expectations of mainstream media, I had to forge my own mission. I mention all of this to say that while we all take different paths, for most of us, journalism is a calling, not simply an adventure. So be it not an outlandish idea that personal missions drive what we do as journalists.

These missions embody what we value most. Maybe we want to help others, or uncover corruption and the abuse of power. Maybe we want to understand and explain how things work, or create positive change in our communities.

The challenge we face, though, is that the longer we stay in the business, the more we’re apt to forget why we got into it. That’s why writing a personal mission statement can be helpful, because it can remind us about our passions.

As journalists we treat the public fairly and openly. Whatever the issue, we tell our audiences the complete, unvarnished truth as best we can learn it. We correct our errors explicitly as soon as we become aware of them.

Any member of The Objective Review who deals with the public is expected to honor that principle, knowing that ultimately the public is our employer. Civility applies whether an exchange takes place in person, by telephone, by letter or by e-mail.

We gather information for the benefit of the people. Journalists at The Objective Review, or on assignment for one of its newsrooms, may not use their position to make inquiries for any other purpose.

We treat news sources fairly and professionally. We do not inquire pointlessly into someone’s personal life. We do not threaten to damage uncooperative sources, nor do we promise favorable coverage in return for cooperation. We do not pay for interviews or unpublished documents: to do so would create an incentive for sources to falsify material and would cast into doubt the genuineness of much that we publish.

Staff members and others on assignment for us should disclose their identity to people they cover, though they need not always announce their occupation when seeking information normally available to the public. Those working for us as journalists may not pose as anyone they are not – for example, police officers or lawyers.

Critics and other writers who review performances or goods and services offered to the public may conceal their press identity, but they may not normally assert a false identity or affiliation.

Staff members and others on assignment for us must obey the law in the gathering of news. They may not break into buildings, homes, apartments or offices.

Web pages and Web logs present imaginative opportunities for personal expression and exciting new journalism. When created by our staff or published on our Web sites, they also require cautions, magnified by the Web’s unlimited reach.

What is our mission?

To Expose…
To Enlighten…
To Commemorate…

“so it is to the printing press–to the recorder of man’s deeds, the keeper of his conscience, the courier of his news–that we look for strength and assistance, confident that with your help man will be what he was born to be: free and independent.” ~John F. Kennedy

“The greater the importance of safeguarding the community from incitements to the overthrow of our institutions by force and violence, the more imperative is the need to preserve inviolate the constitutional rights of free speech, free press and free assembly in order to maintain the opportunity for free political discussion, to the end that government may be responsive to the will of the people.”

New York Times Co. v. US 403 U.S. 713 No. 1873

Contributing to the people with passion and diligence through vigorous and tedious research to get the facts out for an objective review.

The Florida Constitution in article 1 located at section 4 states: Freedom of speech and press.—Every person may speak, write and publish sentiments on all subjects but shall be responsible for the abuse of that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge the liberty of speech or of the press. In all criminal prosecutions and civil actions for defamation the truth may be given in evidence. ’If the matter charged as defamatory is true and was published with good motives, the party shall be acquitted or exonerated.’

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

… this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

~THE OBJECTIVE REVIEW~

Contact us:
http://www.theobjectivereview.com
info@theobjectivereview.com