Crash Course World History Outtakes #3

In which we see outtakes from the last third of the Crash Course World History series.

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The Hydrologic and Carbon Cycles: Always Recycle! – Crash Course Ecology #8

Hank introduces us to biogeochemical cycles by describing his two favorites: carbon and water. The hydrologic cycle describes how water moves on, above, and below the surface of the Earth, driven by energy supplied by the sun and wind. The carbon cycle does the same… for carbon!

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Table of Contents

1) Hydrologic Cycle – 1:15
A) Clouds – 2:13
B) Runoff – 3:06
C) Oceans – 3:41
D) Evapotranspiration – 4:25

2) Carbon Cycle – 5:12
A) Plants – 5:48
B) Fossil Fuels – 6:40
C) Oceans – 7:12
D) Global Warming – 7:35

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3flG

Was Gatsby Great? The Great Gatsby Part 2: Crash Course English Literature #5

SPOILER ALERT: This video assumes you’ve read the book.

In which John Green continues to explore F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby. In this installment, John looks into the titular Gatsby’s purported Greatness. Gatsby’s single-minded pursuit of Daisy, his checkered past, and his checkered present all play a role in determining whether he was, in fact, great. Here’s a hint: you don’t have to be good to be great. It turns out greatness doesn’t have much to do with whether you’re a good person. Along the way, John explores the relentless forward march of time, the use of poetic language, and ironic titling of novels.

Don’t forget to click the Closed Caption button to follow along with the text of the episode. We think you’ll enjoy Danica’s subtitle handiwork. Pause, rewatch, repeat as necessary.

Ecosystem Ecology: Links in the Chain – Crash Course Ecology #7

Hank brings us to the next level of ecological study with ecosystem ecology, which looks at how energy, nutrients, and materials are getting shuffled around within an ecosystem (a collection of living and nonliving things interacting in a specific place), and which basically comes down to who is eating who.

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Table of Contents
1) Defining Ecosystems 0:49:1
2) Trophic Structure 4:44:1
a) Primary Producers 5:27
b) Primary Consumers 5:41
c) Secondary Consumers 5:49:1
d) Tertiary Consumers 5:58:2
e) Detrivores 6:08:1
3) Bioaccumulation 8:47

References and image licenses for this episode in the Google doc here: http://dft.ba/-3f2M

Like Pale Gold – The Great Gatsby Part I: Crash Course English Literature #4

In which John Green explores F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby. John introduces you to Nick Carraway, Jay Gatsby, Daisy and Tom Buchanan, and the other characters in the novel, and tries to look beyond the surface story to figure out what this thing is ABOUT. Set in the 1920’s against a conflicted backdrop of prohibition and excess, The Great Gatsby takes a close look at the American Dream as it existed in Fitzgerald’s time. It turns out, it had a lot to do with money and status, and it still does today. John will cover the rich symbolism of the novel, from the distant green light to the pale gold of wealth and decay. Also, Paris Hilton drops by.

Turn on the captions. You’ll like it.

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Ecological Succession: Change is Good – Crash Course Ecology #6

In the world of ecology, the only constant is change – but change can be good. Today Hank explains ecological succession and how ecological communities change over time to become beautiful, biodiverse mosaics.

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Table of Contents
1. Primary Succession 1:56:1
2. Secondary Succession 3:36
3. Climax Community Model 5:11
4. Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis 7:25:1

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-381q

Love or Lust? Romeo and Juliet Part II: Crash Course English Literature #3

In which John Green returns to William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to explore the themes of true love, lust, and whether Romeo and Juliet were truly, deeply in love, or they were just a pair of impetuous teens. How exactly did Romeo manage to go from pining for Rosaline to marrying Juliet in 36 hours? Maybe they were impetuous teens who were ALSO deeply in love. John looks into how the structure and conventions of society in medieval Verona led to the star-crossed lovers’ downfall. Along the way, you’ll learn about courtly love, medieval responsibility to church, family and society, Chipotle burritos as a metaphor for true love, and even learn about literary sex. We may even tie in trapeze artists and Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody. You’ll have to watch to find out.

Community Ecology II: Predators – Crash Course Ecology #5

Hank gets to the more violent part of community ecology by describing predation and the many ways prey organisms have developed to avoid it.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Herbivory and Parasitism 1:43
Predatory Adaptation 3:39
Cryptic Coloration 4:25
Mullerian Mimicry 5:43
Batesian Mimicry 6:38

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-37Ki

Thanks to the Boone and Crockett Club for letting us film the introduction to this video in their headquarters here in Missoula: http://www.boone-crockett.org/about/about_headquarters.asp?area=about