Of Pentameter & Bear Baiting – Romeo & Juliet Part I: Crash Course English Literature #2

In which John Green examines Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare. John delves into the world of Bill Shakespeare’s famous star-crossed lovers and examines what the play is about, its structure, and the context in which it was written. Have you ever wanted to know what iambic pentameter is? Then you should watch this video. Have you ever pondered what kind of people actually went to see a Shakespeare play in 1598? Watch this video. Were you aware that wherefore means “why?” Whether you were or not, watch this video. In Shakespeare’s time, entertainment choices ranged from taking in a play to watching a restrained bear try to fight off a pack of dogs. Today on YouTube, our entertainment choices are just as wide-ranging. So you can either choose to watch the modern equivalent of bear baiting (another cinnamon challenge) or you can be edified and entertained by John and Crash Course. So wherefore are you reading this description instead of watching the video?

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Community Ecology: Feel the Love – Crash Course Ecology #4

Interactions between species are what define ecological communities, and community ecology studies these interactions anywhere they take place. Although interspecies interactions are mostly competitive, competition is pretty dangerous, so a lot of interactions are actually about side-stepping direct competition and instead finding ways to divvy up resources to let species get along. Feel the love?

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Table of Contents
1) Competitive Exclusion Principle 2:02
2) Fundamental vs. Realized Niche 3:48
3) Eco-lography / Resource Partitioning 5:25
4) Character Displacement 7:29
5) Mutualism 9:15
6) Commensalism 9:55

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2YuA

crashcourse, ecology, biology, competition, evolution, survival, habitat, species, interaction, communities, community ecology, resource, animal, limiting factors, competitive exclusion principle, success, paramecium, competitive advantage, extinction, food, prey, diversity, life, adaptation, niche, security, stability, fundamental niche, realized niche, conflict, nature, natural order, robert macarthur, warbler, ecologist, yale, resource partitioning, observation, zone, hunting, foraging, coexist, organism, selection, character displacement, peter grant, rosemary grant, galapagos finches, trait, mutualism, commensalism, mycorrhizae, termite, obligate mutualism, barnacle

Crash Course World History Outtakes Part II

In which hilarity ensues on the set of Crash Course World History.

Human Population Growth – Crash Course Ecology #3

If being alive on Earth were a contest, humans would win it hands down. We’re like the Michael Phelps of being alive, but with 250,000 times more gold medals. Today Hank is here to tell us the specifics of why and how human population growth has happened over the past hundred and fifty years or so, and how those specifics relate to ecology.

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Table of Contents
1) R vs. K Selection Theory 01:41:1
2) Causes of Exponential Human Growth 03:24
3) Human Carrying Capacity 03:30:2
4) Ecological Footprints 06:40:1
5) Causes for Decline in Human Growth Rate 08:10:1

How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What’s the point of reading critically. John will argue that reading is about effectively communicating with other people. Unlike a direct communication though, the writer has to communicate with a stranger, through time and space, with only “dry dead words on a page.” So how’s that going to work? Find out with Crash Course Literature! Also, readers are empowered during the open letter, so that’s pretty cool.

The Reading List!

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare: http://dft.ba/-shakespearerj

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald: http://dft.ba/-fitzgeraldgg

Catcher in the Rye: http://dft.ba/-catcher

Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson: http://dft.ba/-dickinson

Some of these are available from gutenberg.org as free ebooks. You should check that out.

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Population Ecology: The Texas Mosquito Mystery – Crash Course Ecology #2

Population ecology is the study of groups within a species that interact mostly with each other, and it examines how they live together in one geographic area to understand why these populations are different in one time and place than they are in another. How is that in any way useful to anyone ever? Hank uses the example a of West Nile virus outbreak in Texas to show you in this episode of Crash Course: Ecology.

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Table of Contents
1) Density & Dispersion 02:03
2) Population Growth 03:07
3) Limiting Factors 03:45
a) Density Dependent 06:16
b) Density Independent 07:11
4) Exponential & Logistical Growth 08:04
5) How to Calculate Growth Rate 09:33

References:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-west-nile-virus-20120817,0,2506584.story
http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/idcu/disease/arboviral/westnile/information/general/myths/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosquito
http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/population-limiting-factors-17059572
Campbell Biology 9th ed.

Globalization II – Good or Bad?: Crash Course World History #42

Posters and t-shirts at http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse

In which John asks whether globalization is a net positive for humanity. While the new global economy has created a lot of wealth, and lifted a lot of people out of poverty, it also has some effects that aren’t so hot. Wealth disparity, rising divorce rates, environmental damage, and new paths for the spread of disease. So does all this outweigh the economic benefits, the innovation, and the relative peace that come with interconnected economies? As usual, the answer is not simple. In this case, we’re living in the middle of the events we’re discussing, so it’s hard to know how it’s going to turn out.

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The History of Life on Earth – Crash Course Ecology #1

With a solid understanding of biology on the small scale under our belts, it’s time for the long view – for the next twelve weeks, we’ll be learning how the living things that we’ve studied interact with and influence each other and their environments. Life is powerful, and in order to understand how living systems work, you first have to understand how they originated, developed and diversified over the past 4.5 billion years of Earth’s history. Hang on to your hats as Hank tells us the epic drama that is the history of life on Earth.

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Table of Contents
1) Archaean & Proterozoic Eons 01:53
a) Protobionts 03:54
b) Prokaryotes 04:18
c) Eukaryotes 06:06

2) Phanerozoic Eon 06:42
a) Cambrian Explosion 06:49
b) Ordovician Period 07:36
c) Devonian Period 07:48
d) Carboniferous Period 08:13
e) Permian Period 09:10

References and licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2zRD

crashcourse, biology, ecology, hank green, history, life, human, earth, RNA, genetic material, protobionts, DNA, prokaryote, archaea, archaean, eon, proterozoic, era, period, epoch, fossil record, atmosphere, geologic, time, cyanobacteria, photosynthesis, oxygen revolution, change, environment, eukaryote, endosymbiosis, mitochondria, plastid, algae, cambrian explosion, diversity, animal, evolution, phanerozoic, phyla, ordovician, plant, carboniferous, fossil fuel, system, permian, pangaea, gymnosperm, archosaur, dinosaur, species, extinction, event, asteroid, niche, competition, resource, jurassic, angiosperm, insect, coevolution, bird, mammal, flora, fauna, relationship

Globalization I – The Upside: Crash Course World History #41

Look at Crash Course poster #2: http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse

In which John Green teaches you about globalization, a subject so epic, so, um, global, it requires two videos. In this video, John follows the surprisingly complex path of t-shirt as it criss-crosses the world before coming to rest on your doorstep, and eventually in your dresser. (Unless you’re one of those people who never puts their laundry away and lives out of a laundry basket. If that’s the case, shame on you.) Anyway, the story of the t-shirt and its manufacture in far-flung places like China, Guatemala, and India is a microcosm of what’s going on in the global economy. Globalization is a bit of a mixed bag, and there have definitely been winners and losers along the way. In this episode John will talk about some of the benefits that have come along with it. Next week, he’ll get into some of the less-positive side effects of globalization.

Also, you should turn on the captions.

Thanks to Destin from Smarter Every Day for the cotton footage! http://www.youtube.com/destinws2

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